A label to watch: Mamnick – small, but exquisite

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In my series of presentations of labels I consider worth keeping an eye on, today has brought us to the tiny Northern label of Mamnick. Situated in the defunct steel town of Sheffield in Yorkshire (a town I also have family ties to), Mamnick is named after a road in the Peak District, just outside of Sheffield.

mamnick_pic

Mamnick isn’t so much a clothing label as a clothing and cool-stuff label. Having only 5 products for sale at the moment, I think the best description might be (and I hesitate to utter a word of such pretension) a curated selection of items that proprietor Thom Barnett finds worthy.Of course, all items for sale are designed by Mamnick and produced very locally in Sheffield. The idea appear to let the label grow naturally, when ideas appear.

The three available accessories are all made of legendary Sheffield Steel, world leading in it’s day, but now all but a memory in the once proud Town. If you find yourself in Sheffield, it’s worth visiting the museum to be informed of how much of a force the town was, back in the day. Sheffield Steel has a prominence for Thom, as his grandfather worked with Sheffield Steel for 45 years, and the collection is dedicated to his memory. The personal connection is evident from the descriptions and items them self.

sheffield steel items

Apart from the steel items, Mamnick are also working on shirting. Given how this blog is focusing on being Well Dressed, and also looking to the grown-up, mature man, shirts are of course of the utmost interest to us! In a world where so many shirts are completely indifferent, and differences hard to spot, Mamnick has managed to do some nice detailing that sets them apart design wise. It brings to mind the work SEH Kelly are also doing on shirting, finding ways to come up with fresh details.

The range of shirts consists of 2 styles at the moment, the Backtor and the Clough . Supply is strictly limited to 30 pieces per design for the UK market (with a presumably less restricted number being supplied to Japan).

backtor_linen

The current Backtor shirts come in either a dark denim marl 100% linen or a yellow stripe printed 100% cotton with blue highlights. Both follow the same pattern with a small shawl collar with tab fastening, single chest pocket, engraved Trocas shell buttons and rear hanging loop.

backtor_cotton

The buttons have all been individually cut from natural Trocas shells. No bleaching has taken place and no two buttons are the same.

backtor details

This shirt is made entirely in England in collaboration with WestWarts, Tokyo. Only x30 pieces are available in the UK in each fabric.

clough_main

The second shirt is called the Clough. Clough is Yorkshire dialect for a ravine or gulley and there are several near to Mam Nick.

clough_floral

The shirt comes in two classic Oxford cottons, White and Sky. Plus a floral print inspired by the blossom that decorates Clough itself in spring.

clough_materials

The Clough comes in three colours, a blue floral, sky blue plain and a white plain Oxford, all in 100% cotton. Features include a button down club collar, and a reinforced, offset placket. Mother-of-Pearl engraved buttons can be found on the plain shirts, whilst individual Trocas shell buttons are the choice for the floral.clough_details

These shirts are also made entirely in England in collaboration with WestWarts, Tokyo. Only x15 of each are available in the UK.

To my mind, the best of the 5 variants is the dark denim marl linen variant. I’d love to wear one this summer!

There is talk of a further two styles of shirt, and also outerwear constructed from air-textured yarn. Rumours also talk of the label working with an artist to produce a limited number of hand-stitched pocket squares/handkerchiefs.

Website: www.mamnick.com

As a bonus, Mamnick shirts also work well for those pensive moments when you mull the passing of the proud heritage of bygone times.

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